The trade agreement respects EU rules and rules in the chemical sector and establishes cooperation on regulatory transparency in areas where South Korea now accepts INTERNATIONAL UNECE or EU standards as equivalent to all major South Korean technical regulations. If your vehicles meet these standards, your product does not have to meet additional requirements to be exported under the EU-South Korea trade agreement. The EU-South Korea Trade Agreement contains four sectoral rules on the Free Trade Agreement on non-tariff barriers, notably in the automotive, pharmaceutical, medical device and electronics sectors. Under the EU-South Korea Free Trade Agreement, all rules on pharmaceuticals and medical devices must be published at an early stage so that companies have enough time to understand them. The EU-South Korea trade deal expands the treaties you can compete for. In South Korea, EU companies can now apply for Build-Operate Transfer (BOT) (concession services) contracts. If your company is a European construction and services company, you can compete for large infrastructure projects in South Korea, for example. B the construction and operation of motorways. In the area of electrical safety, South Korea has the option to continue to apply for third-party certification for a limited list of 53 items, if this can justify that they pose a risk to human health and safety. These are set out in Annex 2-B, Appendix 2-B-3, to the Trade Agreement. Korea has free trade agreements with ASEAN, Australia, Canada, Central America (in part), Chile, China, Colombia, India, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the European Union and the European Free Trade Association (Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein), the United States, Turkey and Vietnam.

The full list of Korean free trade agreements is available on the website of the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs (www.fta.go.kr/main/situation/kfta/ov/). For more information on the EU-Korea Free Trade Agreement, please visit the European Union`s website in ec.europa.eu/trade/creating-opportunities/bilateral-relations/countries/korea/. The trade agreement BETWEEN the EU and South Korea protects European Geographical Indications (GIs) so the customs authorities of the exporting country can allow any exporter who exports products under the trade agreement to make origin declarations for products regardless of their value. The exporter must provide the customs authorities with sufficient guarantees to ensure that the originating status of the products and compliance with all other requirements of the Agreement (Protocol) can be verified. The customs authorities may withdraw the status of the approved exporter in the event of abuse. The Republic of Korea is a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and has signed subsidiary agreements, including TRIPs (Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property) and the Agreement on Government Procurement. Korea has been a member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) since December 1996. The U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement entered into force on March 15, 2012. If you`re a U.S. exporter, here you`ll find resources to answer your questions about the U.S.-Korea trade deal: the trade agreement contains clear rules for trademark registration in the EU and South Korea. . .

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