“I”) does not correspond to the verb (z.B. “are”), we say that the subject and the verb do not match. In other words, you have a subject-verb convention error (SVA) which is a common mistake for English learners. I created the above worksheet for my university students in an EAP (English for Academic Purposes) program. Students, you can do the exercises below. Rule 3. The verb in an or, or, or, or not, or ni/or sentence corresponds to the noun or pronoun closest to it. Rule 5a. Sometimes the subject is separated from the verb by words like with, as well as, next to it, not, etc. These words and phrases are not part of the topic.

Ignore them and use a singular if the subject is singular. Countless nouns also use the same verbs as singular nouns. For example: 2. In inverted sentences, the verb corresponds to the noun that comes after. The word that exists, a contraction from there, leads to bad habits in informal sentences as there are many people here today because it is simpler, “there are” than “there are”. Make sure you never use a plural subject. These words are irregular plural nouns (nouns that are not made by adding -s) and they take the plural form of the verb: In this English lesson, you will learn some more advanced cases of subject-verb concordance that distract many learners. These questions are also singular, although they speak of a group of people. Once your students have a solid understanding of themes, predicates, and objects, they are well prepared to create masterful complex sentences. If you are looking for a quiz in the subject-verb agreement, we have two for you.

The first set of questions is fundamental and covers simple subjects composed with nouns or singular pronouns and verbs that must correspond depending on whether they are singular or plural. . . .