Article 2. Two distinct subjects that are linked by or, or, either by a singular verb. Whether two themes are linked by Wedes or either-or-, choosing the right number for the verb for the authors can be difficult. Focus your attention on the name closest to the verb. If it is singular, as in the sentence above, select the singular verb. If the name is plural, select the plural form of the verb. Expressions of rupture like half, part of, a percentage of, the majority of are sometimes singular and sometimes plural, depending on the meaning. (The same is true, of course, when all, all, more, most and some act as subjects.) The totals and products of mathematical processes are expressed in singular and require singular verbs. The phrase “more than one” (weirdly) takes on a singular verb: “More than one student has tried to do so.” Article 1. A theme will be in front of a sentence that will begin. It is a key rule for understanding the subjects.

The word is the culprit in many, perhaps most, subject-word errors. Authors, speakers, readers and listeners too hastily may regret the all too common error in the following sentence: See also this SAT resource for the agreement between themes and supplements. It contains some of the same examples. (These examples are walking around, aren`t they?) Article 4. As a general rule, use a plural verb with two or more subjects when they are by and connected. You will find other sentences showing the correct match between the subject and the verb in examples of subject-verb chords. You can also download and keep our rule infographic to the top 10 shorter. A final point: if two themes are linked by one of the two. . .

. Or not. . again (two of the correlative conjunctions), the verb is accurate with the connator. In such cases, both, and none since, are part of the conjunctions and are not the subject, as is the case in the sentences above: Rule 6. In sentences that begin here or there, the real subject follows the verb. Basic principle: singular subjects need singular verbs; Plural subjects need plural verbs. My brother`s a nutritionist. My sisters are mathematicians. The first example expresses a wish, not a fact; Therefore, what we usually consider plural is used with the singular.

(Technically, this is the singular theme of the object clause in the subjunctive mind: it was Friday.) Usually, it would look awful.